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  • Writer's pictureRosie Haggard

Ready for Renovation: Tips and Tricks for Your Kitchen Remodel

Each kitchen remodel is different. Different visions for the space, different timelines, different aesthetics—different everything!


Something you can always expect with a kitchen remodel: homeowners will be displaced for a period of time. While this may seem daunting—especially for large families, or households with children and pets—there are a few simple steps you can take to ease the transition from out-of-commission kitchen to your dream space.



 

1. Organize, organize, organize!


Second only to your designer, organization is going to be your best friend throughout the remodeling process.


As you begin to pull out your dishes, flatware, utensils, cups, mugs, bakeware, and everything in between, create sections or piles that fall into one of these categories:


Must-haves: Things you use/need daily

  • Plates and bowls

  • Cups

  • Silverware

  • Cutting board

  • Knives

  • Scissors

  • Food storage like Tupperware and Ziploc bags

  • Seasonings


Maybes: Things you might need

  • Corkscrew (okay, maybe this should be on the “must-have” list!)

  • Potato peeler

  • Can opener

  • Tongs

  • Spatulas


Things you rarely use

  • Seasonal items like serveware or decorative dishes

  • Small appliances that don’t get much use

  • Large serving items like bowls and platters


TIP: Coffee drinkers! Don’t forget to keep your grounds, sugars, creamers, and mugs handy.


When you begin packing up your kitchen and storing all of your kitchenware, keep your essential items out of storage containers. And, if you store essential items such as paper towels, garbage bags, dishcloths, and dishwasher soap in your kitchen currently, add them to the “must-haves” pile.


TIP: If you’re packing your kitchen away in boxes, don’t forget to label them! This will make finding items much simpler.


 

2. Build your mini kitchen.


Now that your kitchenware is organized and prioritized, create a mini kitchen in your home—somewhere away from the dusty remodel. Make sure you begin this process before demolition begins. A garage, basement, or even your dining room could serve as a viable substitute for a little while.


Your mini kitchen will not have as many outlets as your kitchen, and those outlets were not built to support multiple small appliances. Keep that in mind as you set up so you can prevent tripping the circuit breakers.


Again, organization is key here, especially if you have a family. Consider using extra storage bins or storage cubes to hide and compartmentalize your piles of plates, silverware, and small appliances. And, of course, label everything!


TIP: If you’re worried about clutter or having to clean after every meal, consider stocking up on paper plates, plasticware, and cups. There are plenty of eco-friendly disposable plate options on the market. Going this route can save you time, and the headache of washing dishes in your powder room sink.


 

3. Preparation is key.


Meal prep is your secret weapon, especially when you don’t have access to your oven and range.


If you have the bandwidth, consider preparing freezer meals prior to demolition while you still have full use of your kitchen. Think of meals that are easy to cook in bulk, and freeze them for future thawing. Soups and stews tend to freeze well, as well as lasagnas, casseroles, bread and baked goods, and cooked meat. Frozen meals are safe to eat indefinitely, and tend to hold their flavor for a few months after initially freezing. So, regardless of how long your remodel lasts, you’ll have plenty of backup meals.

It’s also important to consider what reheating methods you’ll have access to—this will depend on what small appliances you own. Appliances like these are particularly helpful:


  • Crockpot or air fryer

  • Grill

  • Microwave

  • Portable, electric cooktop

  • Toaster oven

 

3. Preparation is key.


If your kitchen shares walls with other spaces such as dining or living rooms, be sure to secure or remove wall-mounted objects before demolition begins. The noise and reverberation of power tools could knock photo frames or mounted china loose.


If you have pets or small children, you will need to restrict their access to the construction area, especially during work hours. It may be a challenge to keep work zones sealed off, but baby gates or other obstacles are readily available at most big-box stores.


If your four-legged friends are easily frightened or nervous around loud noises and new people, consider finding a pet sitter or daycare for them during work hours.


 

4. Safety first!


If your kitchen shares walls with other spaces such as dining or living rooms, be sure to secure or remove wall-mounted objects before demolition begins. The noise and reverberation of power tools could knock photo frames or mounted china loose.


If you have pets or small children, you will need to restrict their access to the construction area, especially during work hours. It may be a challenge to keep work zones sealed off, but baby gates or other obstacles are readily available at most big-box stores.


If your four-legged friends are easily frightened or nervous around loud noises and new people, consider finding a pet sitter or daycare for them during work hours.


 

5. Hit the road!


When in doubt, dine out. Take yourself and your family out for a long lunch or special dinner. Those few hours away mean one less meal to plan and prepare—a welcome reprieve from the chaos of remodeling.

When the bustle of renovation becomes overwhelming—or if you’re looking for a good excuse to go on your dream vacation—get out of town! The summer is perfect for road tripping to new places, while the winter calls for weekends in the snowy mountains.


TIP: During the workweek, if you are unable to leave town for quieter, greener pastures, a good pair of noise-canceling headphones can help you drown out the sounds of construction and escape into music, Podcasts, or audiobooks.


 

6. When in doubt, ask your designer.


Your designer has dealt with the pains of remodeling before—it’s part of their job, after all. They will be able to provide you with tools, tips, and other resources to make the remodeling process as comfortable as possible.


If you have more questions about the remodeling process and how to best prepare for your kitchen overhaul, you can reach out to me directly at Rosie@rmhkitchenandbath.com. I can’t wait to hear more about your kitchen dreams and goals!

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